A conversation with Steve Fetter about research directions for nuclear arms control verification and nuclear nonproliferation

  • room 24-115 MIT Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering Cambridge, MA 02142

Steve Fetter

Professor in the School of Public Policy and Associate Provost at the University of Maryland

Steve Fetter leads the National Security and International Affairs Division of the Office of Science and Technology Policy in the White House. In 2009-12 he served as assistant director at-large in OSTP; in 2011-12 he directed OSTP's environment and energy division and in that capacity oversaw the U.S. Global Change Research Program, was U.S. representative to the Group on Earth Observations, and served as deputy co-chair of the National Ocean Council. Prior government experience includes serving as special assistant to Ash Carter, when Carter was Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Policy, and two stints as a fellow in the State Department. He has been a member of the Director of National Intelligence's Intelligence Science Board and the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee, and a consultant to several U.S. government agencies.

Fetter is on leave from the University of Maryland, where he has been a professor in the School of Public Policy since 1988, serving as dean of the School from 2005 to 2009 and as associate provost of the University since 2012. Fetter is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and a fellow of the American Physical Society, and has served as president of the Association of Professional Schools of International Affairs and vice chairman of the Federation of American Scientists. He has been a member of several committees of the National Academy of Sciences, including the Committee on International Security and Arms Control and committees to assess the effects of nuclear earth-penetrating warheads, internationalization of the nuclear fuel cycle, conventional prompt global strike, and geoengineering. He is a recipient of the American Physical Society's Joseph A. Burton Forum Award, the Federation of American Scientists' Hans Bethe “Science in the Public Service” award, and the Secretary of Defense Medal for Outstanding Public Service. Fetter received a Ph.D. in energy and resources from the University of California, Berkeley, and an S.B. in physics from MIT.